Safety

Keeping schools safe: Gun control grabs the headlines, but more is needed to protect teens

Sandy Hook. Like Columbine before it, the name will forever be attached to school violence.

The struggle to get help: 'Some of us can't do everything ourselves ...'

“Taking care of yourself can have a lot of stigma, but it’s an important thing to do,” writes Tatum Anderson. She also has a few solutions for how others can help her along the way.

Peer-to-peer positivity: Counselors can help, but the real difference makers are students

As counseling resources continue to dwindle, the need for mental health outreach falls on students. Not in a cumbersome way, but in a way they can relate best to their peers — through everyday compassion.

Know the rules, know your school: Inside and out, schools require attentive eyes and ears

How can school officials make sure they’re monitoring every place students might gather? They can’t, but knowing where students like to cluster can be a huge help to time-strapped principals like Michael Bradley of Roosevelt High School.

Tired of waiting for answers, Jordan’s police chief finds his own school safety solution

Post-Sandy Hook, the quiet city of Jordan decided its own unique, perhaps unprecedented, approach was worth pursuing. That meant moving the police chief into the high school, full-time.

The new normal: The threat of violence weighs heavy on the minds of school and safety officials

From mass media to local blogs to the Capitol rotunda, events like the Sandy Hook tragedy have left an indelible mark on our collective psyche. What is happening inside Twin Cities schools to ensure that students are as safe as possible?

Signs of domestic violence aren't always obvious, especially in teen relationships

A disturbing trend for domestic violence in the Twin Cities has claimed the lives of several young women. What should teens know about the warning signs in the same kind of unhealthy relationships?

"Are you buckled up?" Death of a classmate changes life behind the wheel in River Falls

Everything changed when a River Falls teenager was killed in a car accident last May. The click of a buckle could have meant everything.

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Prostitution unmasked: Campaign reveals the pain of teen victims

Organizations led by the Women’s Foundation of Minnesota are rallying for change and working to end the sexual exploitation of teen girls.

Aching for home

In this package of stories, ThreeSixty reporters bring you stories about the more than 2,000 teens estimated to be homeless on any given night in Minnesota.

ThreeSixty reporter Grace Pastoor

At 18, teens “age out” of foster care with no family to help

When a teen in foster care turns 18, the government support they receive while a minor ends. They often have minimal or no family support as they become adults. This means they must leave their foster or group home and provide for themselves.

Ready Htoo's family fled Burma when he was only 4 years old.

Fleeing persecution, Karen teen at home in Minnesota

When Ready Htoo tried his first hot dog in America he loved it – until he found out what it was called.

Radio Rookies from WNYC capture aftermath of 9/11 for teens

To mark the 10th Anniversary of 9/11, Radio Rookies, WNYC’s Peabody Award-winning youth journalism program, presents “Our 9/11: Growing Up in The Aftermath,” an hour special hosted by NPR’s Brooke Gladstone.

Local teen with concussions helps create state law

Kayla Meyer was inspired to testify before the Minnesota Legislature last spring and helped get a law passed that requires youth sports coaches to bench players suspected of having a concussion until they are cleared to play again by a medical professional.

Kimberly Mao, Woodbury High School

Binge drinking does more damage than killing brain cells

Malcolm Peterson, a 21-year-old Century College student, binge drank once when he was 19 and doesn’t remember much from that night. He’s pieced together most of the night from what friends have told him, and he can only remember throwing up three out of five times. He passed out and awoke upstairs at his friend’s house where someone had carried him.

GLBTQ Online High School logo

New online H.S. for GLBTQ students

In January 2010, a new online school opened in Minnesota for GLBTQ students.

Teen guys most likely to be shot in Minnesota

Gunning for trouble

When Joe, a 21-year-old high school student from Minneapolis, was shot last November, he was sure someone was trying to kill him. He knows who shot him and is sure it was gang-related, but he doesn’t want the police involved. Joe’s story reflects who’s most likely to get shot in Minnesota.

Illustration by Ruby Thompson of Avalon School

Cyberbullying is for cowards

Alfred Olson, 16, was visiting an online forum, “Forum Springs,” when an anonymous person told him: “Screw you, you suck.”

Your Turn

Essay contest reveals bullying is common

One surprise in ThreeSixty Journalism’s essay contest about bullying is how common it is, particularly among middle-school students. In most cases, the bullying is not via cyberspace but in the gym, the cafeteria, the school hallway.

Teens explore being a firefighter

Explore your future career, even firefighting

You can’t see. Your fireproof suit and protective gear feel heavier than ever on your back. All you can feel is the ground beneath you and your partner’s ankle that you’re holding. Forming a human chain with your three other partners, blinded by darkness, you proceed through a doorway and crawl to reach an unconscious victim.

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