School

Coming to America, land of obstacles and opportunity

On February 19, 2004, 15-year-old Jaewon Cho stepped out an airplane
at the Minneapolis-St. Paul airport, dazed and tired from a gruesome
14-hour plane ride. Some 6,220 miles away from everything he knew, he stepped
onto the unfamiliar ground of a new country while looking to his parents and older sister for support.

“I felt strange and weird that I was in different country – half excited and half nervous,” Cho remembered.

This New Life in India

Alarm clocks all across America are going off. Many teenagers groan, roll out of bed, throw on whatever they can find, grab a bite to eat, and rush out of the door to go to school.

This not the case for 17-year-old Adia Singh. Each morning, Singh wakes up promptly at 8 a.m., sits down to eat her breakfast with her family, and goes off to school — not to learn but as a volunteer helping feed malnourished children.

She then goes back to her home and gets ready for school.

Why so much testing? Answers from an expert

In an interview with ThreeSixty reporter Annie Wood, David Heistad, executive director of research, evaluation and assessment for Minneapolis Public Schools, discussed why students are required to take so many standardized tests and the value of classroom preparation for the test.

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The Great Debate: Does prepping for standardized tests pay off?

*Editor’s note Why must we take so many standardized tests? Why do we spend so much class time preparing? My teachers have said little more than, “You have to take it because the state requires it.” I’ve never been satisfied with this answer, so I decided to investigate more deeply so we all can better understand something that has such a huge impact on our education.

Here’s what I learned.

DFLer Senate Hopeful Al Franken Draws Crowd at St Paul's Como High

A veteran writer from Saturday Night Live and a St. Louis Park native, Franken hopes to challenge Senator Norm Coleman in the 2008 election. First, he must defeat his DFL challenger for the party endorsement, Minneapolis lawyer Michael Ciresi.

Franken’s critics say his biggest hurdle is his show business past as a writer and comedian. Franken doesn’t agree.

“A satirist looks at a situation and cuts through all the bologna and gets to the truth,” he said.

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Engineering new opportunities for girls

With shortages of engineers on the horizon, the summer STEPS camp at the University of St.

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When cell phones come to school

Although school policy bans their use, student journalists at one junior high learned that their fellow students consider cell phones an essential way to connect with family and friends.

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Failure to progress means freedom to choose

When Humboldt Junior High failed to show adequate yearly progress in students’ test scores, parents received a letter giving them a chance to move their children to other schools.

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Summertime learning -- on the field and in the classroom

The National Youth Sports Program at the University of St. Thomas challenges inner-city youth’s minds and bodies with a mix of summer sports and academics.

Figuring out the magic formula -- then rejecting it

This summer as I was about to start my first term of college, I stumbled across an e-mail I sent freshman year that showed I was willing to do anything to get into Yale University. As I read the e-mail, I remembered the brutal path called the application process and laughed at my initial mindset.

From Gangster to Helper

Summer workshop student Vance McCain profiles Will Wallace, who works in Minneapolis on a housing program for single fathers run by Pillsbury Settl

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Cliques -- a place to belong, a way to exclude.

Student journalists at Humboldt Junior High School in St. Paul talk to teachers and students about why teens form cliques and the pain they can cause.

Summer 2006 Workshop Articles

Fourteen students from Minnesota high schools spent two weeks in June 2006 at the ThreeSixty summer workshop at the University of St. Thomas. The result: four pages of stories published in the Star Tribune and Pioneer Press.

Countdown to College

Join St. Paul senior Matt Smith as he makes his way through the hoops of applying for college.

Education costly for undocumented immigrants

{{“Education costly for undocumented immigrants”}} by Edgar Ullaguari, Lincoln International High School

Students pay high price to park at school

Every year Louis Boney wrote the dreaded check so he could park his Hummer in the Eden Prairie High School parking lot. The payment line: $300.

He’s not alone in paying this much in parking permit cost. Even with parking costs and rising gas prices, students are still choosing to drive to school.

“I think kids are driving to school because of peer pressure and because they think it’s the cool thing to do,” said Jan Holmes of the support staff at Eden Prairie High School.

Twenty students chosen for ThreeSixty summer workshop

Twenty high school students have been chosen to participate in this summer’s ThreeSixty Summer Journalism Workshop at the University of St. Thomas.

The two-week journalism camp will be held June 17-29 at the St. Thomas campus in St. Paul. Six of the students selected are African-American, seven are Asian-American, three are Latino and four are Caucasian. Eight of them will also participate in a one-week broadcasting camp from July 3-7.

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What happens when bad news goes home.

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Cliques -- place to belong, a way to exclude.

Humboldt Junior High students know exactly {{what cliques their peers belong to.}} Most are groups of friends who share certain interests or activities. But immigrant kids called Fresh Off the Boat speak out about how it hurts to be labelled.

Engineering for Girls

ThreeSixty summer workshop students Sage Davis and Pat Gustafson tell the video story of {{7th grade girls}} who spend two weeks at the University of St. Thomas learning science and engineering skills.

The crowning achievement is a model airplane that each girl builds and flies. The idea of the STEPS program is to encourage girls to study science, math and engineering in college

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