Safety

See video

Cliques -- a place to belong, a way to exclude.

Student journalists at Humboldt Junior High School in St. Paul talk to teachers and students about why teens form cliques and the pain they can cause.

Cleaning up a neighborhood -- one trash bag at a time

Crumpled and ripped phonebooks, cigarette butts, Cheeto bags and broken beer bottles began to accumulate and dirty up the sidewalks and streets in my neighborhood last summer. This summer, people in the Holland neighborhood in Northeast Minneapolis noticed an increase in litter – particularly under the bridge on 24th and Washington near Edison High School. What was interesting was seeing how the neighborhood came together to deal with it.

Students gang together to fight murder

{{“Students gang together to fight murder”}} by Julia Wang, Eden Prairie High School

Teens, no talking while driving

Sixteen-year-old Thomas Birai walks out of his house chomping on some toast. The chain around his neck jingles with each step. He gets into his car, buckles his seat belt and takes off down the street toward the corner. His cell phone rings. It’s a friend. He slows down, picks up the phone and answers.

MAD DADS fight back in Northside

Balloons are no longer only used to show where a birthday party is being held on the North Side of Minneapolis, but are decor on memorial trees for innocent victims, including Charez Jones, the 14-year-old girl who was shot and killed June 9.

From Gangster to Helper

Summer workshop student Vance McCain profiles {{Will Wallace}}, who works in Minneapolis on a housing program for single fathers run by Pillsbury Settlement Services. Wallace, a one-time Gangster Disciple, has developed a powerful message for wanna-be gang bangers: Learn something. Go to school, and the world gets bigger--and better.

Tags:

St. Paul Cops’ Best Friend (1)

{{The St. Paul Department's canine unit}}, and their training, are some of the best in the country and regularly win competitions with other departments. ThreeSixty 2006 summer workshop students Angelica Birch and Mercedes Akinseye each did a story about the dogs and their training.

Syndicate content