Race

See video

News that fits a diverse audience

According to one directory, there are 94 new ethnic media in Minnesota and the Twin Cities: weekly newspapers, monthly magazines, cable newscasts, radio shows and regular newsletters.

The mainstream media are getting the idea. Paul Douglas and his newly created Weather Nation recently hired two bilingual meteorologists. The Star Tribune is seeking new readers and discovering untold stories in the growing ethnic communities.

East African immigrant students support Obama 100 percent

Ubah Medical Academy, predominantly an East African immigrant school in Hopkins, Minn., was buzzing with joy and excitement over the previous nights elections Nov. 5. Not a single student at Ubah supported John McCain. Student were euphoric as they exchanged greetings and congrats. Every other sentence you heard in the hallways contained the phrase “We made history!”

Harding reacts with silent anticipation: What's next? students ask

Barack Obama is the new President, and the reaction at Harding High School in St. Paul is eerie silence. Hmong students make up a little of more than fifty percent of Harding’s student body. Normally the Hmong community votes for the Democratic party, but Hmong students at Harding supported both candidates.

Obama is new role model, new hope for African-American teens

The last day of the Democratic National Convention when Barack Obama spoke about the 40th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I have a dream” speech is when I became emotionally engaged.

I was no longer happy to vote just because it was my first time voting. I was proud to vote because of the historic meaning this election represented. I became inspired while watching Obama deliver his great speech to cap off a great convention.

Change was the message Barack Obama used to motivate his voters. I hope change can help put an end to the race issue in America. The country
has come a long way — no doubt — but there still is more to be done. Sometimes my friends and I talk about times when we felt we were being stereotyped as thugs. I also hope Obama can help more young blacks get serious about politics.

ThreeSixty reporter Paris Porter featured on MPR

In March, ThreeSixty writer Paris Porter wrote about his family’s move to St. Paul back in 1996 to escape the violence and poverty of Chicago’s South Side. This summer, Paris and Minnesota Public Radio producer Sasha Aslanian produced a powerful radio documentary about his family’s experience and the controversy the inflow of poor, black families from Chicago caused in Minnesota in the 1990s. Listen to the radio story and read his original story here.

At-risk teen found home at Briggs & Morgan

Walking in, we find marble floors, nice polished wooden tables, and quiet. A beautiful receptionist offers us soda and some chocolate. Looking out the windows, we see the Foshay Tower and people in suits, walking the streets below, enjoying the summer weather.

Richard Terrell walks in with a warming smile and greets us, looking like the next new thing in the Briggs and Morgan law firm.

The IDS building, which is in the heart of downtown Minneapolis, is home to one of the most prestigious law firms in the state of Minnesota. Terrell, dressed in a two-piece suit on the 22nd floor, has come a long way from being an at-risk youth. The 21-year-old has worked at Briggs and Morgan as an intern during summers and school breaks for five years.

Election 2008: Young voters, new voices

Nico Brown graduated this spring from Face To Face Academy in St. Paul. It was his toughest year; Barack Obama helped him through.

“I sat and I watched him on TV and listened to some things he would say, and it made me want to push more. He said that I could be something — you know, more than just the stereotype.”

Tags:

Election 2008: Young voters, new voices

Nico Brown graduated this spring from Face To Face Academy in St. Paul. It was his toughest year; Barack Obama helped him through.

“I sat and I watched him on TV and listened to some things he would say, and it made me want to push more. He said that I could be something — you know, more than just the stereotype.”

What is poverty? Views from North Minneapolis

Students from Kwanzaa Freedom School took video cameras to the streets of North Minneapolis and asked residents to describe poverty, how it differs from poverty in othe countries and how it affects teens specifically. Here’s what they heard.

Legislators look for ways to end poverty in Minnesota

Minnesota’s 9.2 percent poverty rate, which counts the number of peole without enough money to pay for basic needs, is lower than the nation’s 12.3 percent. But the rate is higher for Minnesota children and young adults. Eleven of every 100 Minnesotans younger than 18 live in poverty, as do 19 of every 100 Minnesotans between 18 and 24.

To determine what policies could end poverty in Minnesota by 2020, a legislative commission is now gathering information and ideas from Minnesotans at public meetings across the state. At the end of this year, the commission will bring its recommendations to the Minnesota Legislature.

To find out about the commission’s work, ThreeSixty reporter Alexandra Sifferlin with commission director Gregory Gray, who grew up poor in Minneapolis and formersly represented North Minneapolis in the legislature.

Syndicate content