Race

Betty Ellison-Harpole

Growing up in the Jim Crow South: Prepared for racism

I was born and raised in Memphis, Tennessee, the seventh of eight children. I went to a segregated kindergarten, grade school, and high school. I had all African American teachers. They were very good. We lived in an African American neighborhood, where the people were very supportive of each other. At home they would tell us what we could expect out in the world and how we might be treated.

Rebecca Peltzer-Miller, Central High School

Staying on the same page

Superintendent Valeria Silva thinks when parents walk into any St. Paul Public School, it should be like walking into a Target store.

“Wherever you go in any part (of Target), you’re going to know that there are standards. You see your ads on the wall … the manager’s picture … so you have a set of expectations,” Silva said.

Critics worry change to neighborhood schools could lessen diversity

In St. Paul Central High School’s cafeteria, it’s easy to see how diverse the school is. Just listening in on students’ conversations, you can hear just about every language being spoken from Somali to Spanish to Hmong.

Vang Thao, Community of Peace Academy

Hmong culture being adopted across Twin Cities

At the 2010 Hmong New Year at the Metrodome, Jasmine Tierra Bondurant, an 18-year-old African-American girl, appeared on stage and sang two Hmong songs: “Mi Noog” by Sudden Rush and “Nyog Ib Sab” by Pagnia Xiong.

Catanis Yang, 19, of St. Michael, Minn. watched Jasmine perform and was blown away.

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Patience before and after her big chop

My hair is a statement I never planned to make

More than a year ago, Patience Zalanga decided to “go natural” and stop chemically relaxing hair. After cutting it off in a “big chop,” this St. Paul teen’s hair took her on a journey of discovery about just how much of a statement hair can be.

Rapper Brother Ali never earned his diploma, but he wants to now

Q & A with Rapper Brother Ali: High school opens huge doors

Local rapper Brother Ali never finished high school. It made him feel shame, which is why he helped out Minneapolis public schools with an effort to attract back high school drop outs by doing a TV commercial for the district. After finishing his current tour, Brother Ali plans to finish his diploma.

Junior Edwin Flowers and Principal Liz Wynne at Twin Cities Academy

Expecting more of our young black men -- and ourselves

When Edwin Flowers started attending Twin Cities Academy as a freshman, he figured that he’d catch some breaks since the principal is African-American like Edwin.

Liz Wynne quickly corrected that assumption. “I’m going to be harder on you,” she warned. “You’ve got to set an example for the younger students.”

Mind you, Edwin wasn’t a role model at the time. He was creative, funny, often in trouble for talking in class and so far behind in math he had essentially given up. Two and a half years later, he has a 3.65 GPA and a busy schedule as a basketball player, spoken word artist and ThreeSixty writer.

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Nyasia Arradondo

My black student group: support, not segregation

When a white student at her school questioned why black students like Nyasia needed an after-school group just for them, she had an answer for him. And an invitation.

How teens count to America, read the winning essays

How do teens count to America? Read the essays published in the Star Tribune and Pioneer Press

This spring, the government will attempt to count every single person living in the United States in the 2010 Census. ThreeSixty, the St. Paul Pioneer Press and Minneapolis Star Tribune asked teenagers how they count to America. Their essays were published in both papers, and online on April 1. Check them out!

How teens count to America

How teens count to America, read the winning essays published in the Star Tribune and Pioneer Press

This spring, the government will attempt to count every single person living in the United States in the 2010 Census. ThreeSixty, the St. Paul Pioneer Press and Minneapolis Star Tribune asked teenagers how they count to America. On April 1, their essays were published in both papers, and online.

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