Politics

Youth destroy 'apathetic voter' reputation in 2008

Young people are notorious for being idealistic, yet lacking follow through; they consistently vote at a rate far lower than the national average. However, in the 2008 election, exit polls indicate that youth will kick the stereotype of civic irresponsibility.

According to recent Gallup Polls, two out of three youth voters suported Barack Obama. The last time youth participation spiked, the Democrat Bill Clinton won the White House in 1992.

Mariyah Khan, an 18-year old student at the University of Minnesota, said that she planned to vote because she is concerned about the present state of the economy and social security. “I don’t think we’re going to get (to retire) … In our nation, you’re supposed to work, and then they give us something back for it,” she said. “We talk about not being able to enjoy your life — you’ll just have to keep working, which really sucks.”

Your Turn -- Teens advise the new president on what youth need

September’s Your Turn writing contest asked teens to give their opinion on what the next president could do for American youth. Here is a collection of the advice they have for President Barack Obama.

Lesson from China's Great Leap Forward: Don't blindly follow leaders

My grandpa Yue Zhou was a 27-year-old college instructor in communist China at the time of the Great Leap Forward, which took place from 1958 through 1963, and it was a time of extreme hardship for the people of China.

Youngest republican delegate says participating in RNC was historic

Mike Knopf is in many ways an ordinary teen. He plays high school football, works a part-time job and has a girlfriend. But in politics, he is different. In a year when most young voters are supporting Barack Obama, the 17-year-old from Dubuque, Iowa, is a huge John McCain supporter. He was the youngest delegate at the Republican National Convention held in September in St. Paul.

September Your Turn -- essay highlights

Several of September’s essays contained illuminating points about what teenagers care about right now. We liked them so much that we put together a list of their quotes.

Immigration
I want Barack Obama to open the border for three reasons. First, most of the Latinos want jobs. Second they want a life that Mexico can’t give us. Third, Latinos are not criminals; we just want a better life for our kids such as education, jobs, and things like that. — Luis Pacheco, 14, Harding High School

September Your Turn contest winners

More than 120 students around the Twin Cities submitted essays to September’s Your Turn on what they would tell the presidential candidates about how they can help American youth. The responses were incredibly diverse and ranged from calls to end the war in Iraq, a solution to teen homelessness, and a request for an iPhone.
The winners this month were Global Warming by Rachel Mosca, Dear Mr. President by Claire Mahoney, Senority means nothing by Matteo Alampi, Hopes for the future by Chris Ulrich, and Asking Barack Obama to lower gas prices by Mai Der Yang

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Students at Humboldt Junior High talk about Barack Obama

This report from Humboldt Junior High finds many young men, especially young black men, fear if Barack Obama is elected that he will be assassinated.

Political conventions a carnival of democracy

It was a hot July afternoon at the Convention Hall that fateful day in 1948. It was inside the Democratic National Convention when Minneapolis’s own mayor Hubert H. Humphrey addressed his party and demanded that Democrats “get out of the shadow of states’ rights and walk forthrightly into the bright sunshine of human rights.” Turmoil ensued and Humphrey’s unprecedented proposal resulted in southern delegates walking out of the convention.

What happens at all those parties?

With a Republican National Convention in town this week, there were hundreds of different receptions and parties all across the Twin Cities. Most of them were closed to the public. What really goes on inside one of these receptions? Members of the ThreeSixty Journalism staff were recently invited to attend a reception held by Best Buy at the Minnesota History Museum in St. Paul. Here’s what we learned.

Rock out with your cause out

On Labor Day, the Service Employee’s International Union held its first “Take Back Labor Day” concert on Harriet Island in St. Paul, a concert the union hopes to make an annual event.

Featuring a notable set list that included Grammy-winner hip-hop artist Mos Def, and former Rage Against the Machine guitarist Tom Morello, the union hoped to raise awareness about the problems currently facing labor unions in the United States while the Republican Party took center stage at the Xcel Energy Center across the river.

“Labor unions are a fundamental component of democracy,” folk-country musician Steve Earle said, which was followed by immediate applause.

Bike sharing at RNC a success

As the RNC packed its banners, balloons and giant TV screen and headed out of town, the Freewheelin bike-sharing program piloted at the political conventions in Denver and St. Paul reported terrific success.

The program is a joint operation between Humana, one of the nation’s largest public health benefits companies, and Bikes Belong, a bike advocacy organization that works to help programs that get people on bikes.

Freewheelin aims to cut down American obesity levels and the nation’s carbon foot print, according to a press release.
With a total of 7,523 rentals, riders pedaled 41,724 miles — 15,141 of these miles in the Twin Cities — burned a total of almost 1.3 million calories, and reduced their carbon footprint by 14.6 metric tons.

Day 2: RNC focus shifts back to McCain

With the threat of Hurricane Gustav past, Republicans were ready to sell John McCain as the next president at day two of the Republican National Convention in St. Paul.

Republicans Fred Thompson, a former Tennessee senator, and Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) a former Democrat, sold McCain as an experienced war veteran who is ready to lead the United States.

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SLIDE SHOW: Monday RNC Protest

ThreeSixty photographer Leah Sorensen joined the estimated 10,000 protesters in downtown St. Paul on the first day of the Republican National Convention.

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Fairgoers think pronto pups more than politics

As many teens enjoyed their last day of summer at the fair, it seemed that the Republican National Convention and the election were far from their minds.

Of the 10 teens interviewed at the Minnesota State Fair – mostly at the CNN Election Booth – the majority said they haven’t been following the Republican National Convention that opened in St. Paul on Monday.

Thousands march to protest Republican policies

A strange sight confronted protesters who gathered on the Capitol lawn the first day of the Republican National Convention: a polar bear.

Minneapolis resident Mina Leierwood painted her body white, her nose and lips black, donned a white polar bear cap, a white tutu, and roller blades to protest Republican vice presidential nominee and current governor of Alaska, Sarah Palin during the protests on the opening day of the Republican National Convention.

Quiet first day at Republican convention

With the first day of the Republican National Convention shortened to two and a half hours due to worries over Hurricane Gustav, party representatives decided to make the best of it and focus on hurricane relief on Monday.

As First Lady Laura Bush and Cindy McCain, John McCain’s wife, took the podium at the Xcel Center in St. Paul, they focused on relief efforts for hurricane victims on the Gulf Coast. There was applause but the crowd never got a chance to erupt.

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Police meet protests with firm hand

To describe the amount of security outside the first day of the Republican National Convention in St. Paul in one word, that word would be: stunning. As thousands of protesters filed down from the capital, hundreds of police officers stood shoulder-to-shoulder to direct them through the route through downtown St. Paul.

Political conventions a carnival of democracy

It was a hot July afternoon at the Convention Hall that fateful day in 1948. It was inside the Democratic National Convention when Minneapolis’s own mayor Hubert H. Humphrey addressed his party and demanded that Democrats “get out of the shadow of states’ rights and walk forthrightly into the bright sunshine of human rights.” Turmoil ensued and Humphrey’s unprecedented proposal resulted in southern delegates walking out of the convention.

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Whom do you support for President?

John McCain
13%
Barack Obama
87%
Ralph Nader
0%
Other
0%

SEPTEMBER 2008: The Republicans arrive

In claiming the Republican nomination for president, John McCain made one thing clear in his acceptance speech: “Change is coming.”

McCain’s speech ended the Republican National Convention’s four-day run, which started out slow due to Hurricane Gustav.

McCain’s speech targeted mostly families of America, whom he promised to fight for as he fought for his country while a member of the Navy.

“What you fight for is the real test. I fight for Americans. I fight for you,” he said during his speech.

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