Politics

Caralyn Tignanelli, 19, and John Madison, 18

Young voters could make impact on the election, if they actually vote

Ashish Upreti sat on a damp curb, one of thousands of Minnesotans in line Oct. 23 to see President Barack Obama speak in support of Democratic Party candidates at the University of Minnesota at a rally. This election, Tues. Nov. 2, will be the 22-year-old’s first time voting.

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Election 2010

Election 2010: Will young people vote?

When Barack Obama won the 2008 presidential election, many political pundits credited the high youth voter turnout as a deciding factor in his win. Traditionally, when youth actually turn out to the polls, they have a big impact on elections.

David Gilbert-Pederson and Richard Mammen

School board candidate's 20-year-old campaign manager doesn't have high school diploma

David Gilbert-Pederson seems like any other kid fresh out of high school. He is curious about what his crush says about him, has a tremendous appetite, and is shy around new people. But this 20-year-old also manages the campaign of Richard Mammen, one of the Democratic Party’s choices for the Minneapolis school board. But David doesn’t have a high school diploma.

Election 2010

Bigger classes? Better teachers? How the governors' race matters to teens.

The governors’ election in Minnesota this year can make or break your next school year. Mark Dayton is the DFL candidate, Tom Emmer is the Republican candidate and Tom Horner is the Independence Party candidate. Each is offering something different to the schools if he becomes governor.

Even though I’m not of voting age yet, this election is important to me to see what the candidates have to offer and why this election makes a difference for schools.

Do you care who wins for Minnesota governor?

YourTurn winner

YourTurn winners: To vote or not to vote?

More than 80 teens responded to ThreeSixty’s YourTurn that asked if they would vote Nov. 2 if they could, even if they aren’t 18. Their responses surprised us.

What freedom are you most thankful for in America?

The freedom of press
12%
The freedom of speech
53%
The freedom of religion
24%
The freedom to vote
6%
The right to own a gun or weapon
6%
Protection from unreasonable searches of belongings
0%
My favorite freedom isn’t listed
0%
I don’t think I have much freedom
0%
Exterior of Arlington High School

Its mascot is the phoenix, but Arlington H.S. will not rise from ashes

On April 14, while most students in the state of Minnesota were fretting about their MCAs, the students at Arlington Senior High in St. Paul were distraught over news the district wanted to shut down their school.

How teens count to America, read the winning essays

How do teens count to America? Read the essays published in the Star Tribune and Pioneer Press

This spring, the government will attempt to count every single person living in the United States in the 2010 Census. ThreeSixty, the St. Paul Pioneer Press and Minneapolis Star Tribune asked teenagers how they count to America. Their essays were published in both papers, and online on April 1. Check them out!

How teens count to America

How teens count to America, read the winning essays published in the Star Tribune and Pioneer Press

This spring, the government will attempt to count every single person living in the United States in the 2010 Census. ThreeSixty, the St. Paul Pioneer Press and Minneapolis Star Tribune asked teenagers how they count to America. On April 1, their essays were published in both papers, and online.

Being 16 in Minnesota. See 100 years of change.

Guide to the 2010 Census

Every 10 years, the U.S. government mails a census form to every home in America and does its best to count every person.

Why bother? Why don’t some people want to be counted? And what do all those numbers tell us about our country and how it’s changing?

This month, as census forms arrive in the mail, ThreeSixty writers answer those questions and more. We invite you to explore the articles and graphics, then leave a comment and share this work with a friend. Your opinion counts – just like every person in America.

I never chose my race, other people did it for me

In the middle of ninth grade, my family moved from suburban Shoreview to St. Paul. I transferred to Arlington High School, a school with significantly fewer white kids, and more black and mixed-raced kids than I’d known before. The kids would make fun of me for things harder to change than my hair – my light skin, my suburban accent, my mostly Asian and white friends, and my punk style. They thought I acted like a white kid.

My parents had taught me all my life that I was black, but now, I was white.

Confused about race? So is the Census

In 1990, Robert Lilligren had to choose whether to check American Indian or white on the census form. Even though he is both, the census form only allowed him to choose one.

Want President Obama at graduation? Apply by March 15!

What does the census ask and why?

The 2010 census is the shortest in its 220 year history, said Minnesota State Demographer Tom Gillaspy. It only asks 10 questions this decade.

Census puts a lot at stake -- $4 trillion and a vote in Congress

The census, first required in 1790, is — as Minnesota State Demographer Tom Gillaspy says — “the very core of being American.” When we were fighting the Revolutionary War, we were fighting for representation, and that’s exactly what the census has set out to do – represent us by counting us.

The Republicans arrive

From the chaos of the street protests to the political maneuvering inside the Xcel Center, ThreeSixty’s reporters dove into the deep end of the 2008 Republican National Convention.

Census taps teens to spread the word

A quick look around Minnesota’s state demographer’s office made clear that teens are a prime target for messages promoting next month’s national Census.

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