Jobs

At-risk teen found home at Briggs & Morgan

Walking in, we find marble floors, nice polished wooden tables, and quiet. A beautiful receptionist offers us soda and some chocolate. Looking out the windows, we see the Foshay Tower and people in suits, walking the streets below, enjoying the summer weather.

Richard Terrell walks in with a warming smile and greets us, looking like the next new thing in the Briggs and Morgan law firm.

The IDS building, which is in the heart of downtown Minneapolis, is home to one of the most prestigious law firms in the state of Minnesota. Terrell, dressed in a two-piece suit on the 22nd floor, has come a long way from being an at-risk youth. The 21-year-old has worked at Briggs and Morgan as an intern during summers and school breaks for five years.

Many low-income voters fear their votes don't count

Lylian Davis stood outside her mobile home, squinted at the sun and considered the presidential election.

“Yeah, I’m going to vote. For whom, I’m undecided.” Among her neighbors in Landfall, a tiny St. Paul suburb of mobile homes where 1 in 5 of about 700 residents lives in poverty, Davis thinks she’s unusual.

“ ‘ Oh, my vote doesn’t count.’ That’s all I hear around here.” Davis said.

Hot summer, cool job market

For some teens, summer is a time to kick back, relax, and soak in the sun. But for many others, it is a time to make money by landing a summer job. However, across the nation the job market has been weakening and teens are feeling the impact.

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Tips for finding summer work

When it comes to landing a job in this summer’s competitive atmosphere, teens can do a few things to improve their chances.

Step-Up, a program that helps place 16 to 21 year-old Minneapolis residents in summer jobs, suggests putting together a resume and learn how to handle a interview. On the resume, highlight your volunteer work and family responsibilities.

Fast-food jobs aren't so easy

When teenagers think of summer jobs, they often think of getting a job at a fast food restaurant. Sound simple? Think again. Teens who have actually worked at a fast food place like Kentucky Fried Chicken or McDonald’s say it’s not as easy as it looks.

Dressing up in character

When people usually talk about costume shops, they think of Halloween and decorations. But what do the people that work there go through? What is it like to work in this type of establishment?

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Dressing up in character

When people usually talk about costume shops, they think of Halloween and decorations. But what do the people that work there go through? What is it like to work in this type of establishment?

Candy store job is usually sweet

Chocolate, jumbo jaw breakers, caramel turtles, large gumballs, chocolate stars. All the aromas hit you as you walk into the small store.

Tax time: Even if you aren't required to file, a refund may make it worth the trouble

While the world of work may open doors for teens financially, it also adds an element of responsibility to our lives – taxation.

The process of filing W-4s, W-2s and 1040s may seem overwhelming at first, but filing taxes is something that most people will face doing every year for the rest of their lives. Most teens have the opportunity to file the simplest of all federal tax forms, the 1040EZ. It is a simple, one-page form that can be used by individuals without dependents and can be filed electronically or on paper in a matter of minutes.

Extended adolescence may be widening the class gap

Both Courtney Johnson and Mariah Grunke attend the same high school, Benilde-St. Margaret’s. Both plan on attending college. Grunke is doing her applications independently because her father did not go to college and doesn’t like filling out forms. Meanwhile, Johnson’s parents are very involved in her application process.

Although seemingly insignificant, their parents’ ability to help them with things like college applications may make a big difference.

According to Teresa Swartz, an assistant sociology professor at the University of Minnesota, the amount of resources parents can give their young adult children affects the children’s future more than ever. And her research suggests that the gap between young adults from families with substantial resources and those with few is growing wider. That can lead to harmful social divisions, she says.

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What is poverty? Views from North Minneapolis

Students from Kwanzaa Freedom School took video cameras to the streets of North Minneapolis and asked residents to describe poverty, how it differs from poverty in othe countries and how it affects teens specifically. Here’s what they heard.

Legislators look for ways to end poverty in Minnesota

Minnesota’s 9.2 percent poverty rate, which counts the number of peole without enough money to pay for basic needs, is lower than the nation’s 12.3 percent. But the rate is higher for Minnesota children and young adults. Eleven of every 100 Minnesotans younger than 18 live in poverty, as do 19 of every 100 Minnesotans between 18 and 24.

To determine what policies could end poverty in Minnesota by 2020, a legislative commission is now gathering information and ideas from Minnesotans at public meetings across the state. At the end of this year, the commission will bring its recommendations to the Minnesota Legislature.

To find out about the commission’s work, ThreeSixty reporter Alexandra Sifferlin with commission director Gregory Gray, who grew up poor in Minneapolis and formersly represented North Minneapolis in the legislature.

Know the rules when you get a job

If you’re under the age of 18 and plan on performing in any aerial or acrobatic acts, Don’t. You would be breaking state law. And if you’re under the age of 16, don’t even think about operating any sort of dry cleaning equipment, meat slicing machinery or even snow blowers. Perhaps it’s for the best that people under 16 just stay away from machines altogether.

Though they may sound slightly absurd, these are real child labor laws put in place to help protect Minnesota’s children from exploitation and out of harm’s way.

School, mentors and work can help teens break the hold of poverty

When Shelly Hunter left home three years ago because of ongoing fights with her parents, she knew she’d have to work to support herself. At 16, she was a good student at a Minneapolis high school, and she planned to go to college.

But it was hard to earn enough for food, rent and a car. Shelly, who asked that her real name be kept private, had to leave school an hour early to pick up her boyfriend at his job. From 5 to 10 p.m., she worked at a McDonald’s in Minneapolis. After that, she cleaned offices until 3 a.m. After a few hours of sleep, she’d get up, take her boyfriend to work and get to school by 9:30 a.m.

School, mentors and work can help teens break the hold of poverty

When Shelly Hunter left home three years ago because of ongoing fights with her parents, she knew she’d have to work to support herself. At 16, she was a good student at a Minneapolis high school, and she planned to go to college.

But it was hard to earn enough for food, rent and a car. Shelly, who asked that her real name be kept private, had to leave school an hour early to pick up her boyfriend at his job. From 5 to 10 p.m., she worked at a McDonald’s in Minneapolis. After that, she cleaned offices until 3 a.m. After a few hours of sleep, she’d get up, take her boyfriend to work and get to school by 9:30 a.m.

“Work meant survival,” Shelly said in an e-mail interview. “I moved out from my parent’s house when I was 16. I had to survive somehow.”

Research says that for teens, school and work mix well if students work 10-15 hours a week regularly. What do you think?

Chasing fads keeps wallet empty

July 10th, 2006, was the most significant day marked on the 2006 calendar posted on the wall of my room. On that date T-Mobile officially released the latest and hippest version of one of its most popular cell phones, the Sidekick 3.

The hype surrounding this cell phone was ludicrous. So was the pricing — $399 plus tax.

I wanted it anyway.

I placed it at the top of my birthday list, which was four days later. To my disappointment, I didn’t get what I so desperately wanted. Angry and frustrated, I asked my parents why. They gave me the obvious reason: the cell phone was too expensive.

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Selling crops to help the family

In the Twin Cities, many Hmong teens spend their summers growing and selling vegetables to help support their families.

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Engineering for Girls

ThreeSixty summer workshop students Sage Davis and Pat Gustafson tell the video story of 7th grade girls who spend two weeks at the University of St.

Summer in the City

Those lazy, hazy days of summer are times to be free or to work hard, to get your feet wet, your car dirty and your mind straight. Teens in ThreeSixty’s summer broadcast camp tell the stories of summer in the Twin Cities.

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