MOVIE REVIEW: Star Trek

Photo by Industrial Light & Magic Provided by Paramount Pictures
Its greatest accomplishment is that it takes a cult series and turns science fiction into something that can be immensely enjoyed by a general audience, much in the same way last summer’s “Iron Man” did for comic books.

Director J.J. Abrams (of “LOST” and “Cloverfield” fame), brings to life a series formerly enjoyed only by a cult following known as “Trekkies.” Abrams brings the corny TV show “Star Trek” to life not with one bang, but many.

Of the 11 films previous to the 2009 movie, none give an origin story for the two main characters: Captain James T. Kirk, played by Chris Pine, and pointy-eared, half-human, half-Vulcan Spock, played by Zachary Quinto.

Kirk is established as a daredevil, who dispises conforming to tradition and has a great disregard for logic. Whilst Kirk is an impulsive character, Spock runs on logic, with a stony expression and an eternal tone of polite interest. The movie gives the audience a chance to truly appreciate the characters, and what defines them as two of the most famous personalities of all time.

The opening sequence of the film really sets the stage for the look, feel, and tone of the movie: bright colors, fantastic special effects, big explosions, lots of lasers, and an energy that the series desperately needs.

The movie’s tattooed, pointy-eared villain, Nero, played with fantastic ferocity by Eric Bana, is out for revenge after his home planet of Romulus is destroyed, and will stop at nothing to destroy every member planet of the interplanetary organization called the Federation. Commanding a massive ship that looks like a giant hair comb from hell, he travels through space and time, destroying planets by making them implode.

Enter James Kirk, son of renowned captain George Kirk, who died fighting Nero, but in the process saved the lives of 800 people, including his son. James is a bit of a playboy. This is not to say that he is not compassionate. He is determined to prove himself, and ascend the ranks of Starfleet at warp speed.

From an early start, he makes as many enemies as he does friends, and among those enemies is Spock. Quickly they must put aside their differences as they race toward the planet Vulcan, answering a distress call.

From there, the film moves with relentless ecstasy and energy. While most directors would make the fast-paced story frantic, J.J. Abram makes it exciting for every minute, even managing to fit in a cameo by Leonard Nimoy as an older version of Spock. The script is humorous and witty, and the special effects are a wonder to behold.

Some might call “Star Trek” cliché science fiction, but it is more than that. Its greatest accomplishment is that it takes a cult series and turns science fiction into something that can be immensely enjoyed by a general audience, much in the same way last summer’s “Iron Man” did for comic books.

Emmet’s opinion: “Star Trek” is a warp-speed thrill ride. Beam me up, Scotty. I’m ready for the sequel.

“Star Trek” is rated PG-13. There’s some pretty intense spaceship action, and underwear-clad cadets.

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